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The Sin Offering

08.14.17 | Old Testament Feast | by Elder Steven Rogers

The Sin Offering

    The Sin Offering

    The Sin offering, or as translated in the Hebrew as chatta’ah, means offence and its punishment or penalty for sin.  The chatta’aht is derived from the Hebrew root word chayt, meaning "missing the mark," which reveals to us that this specific sin offering recorded in Leviticus chapter four was for unintentional sin.    

    Just like the burnt offering, the animal sacrifice which the offerer brought t the priest varied according to economic class and social standing.  However, what made the sin offering different from other offerings is that some of the blood of the sacrifice was sprinkled upon the horns of the altar of incense.


    Note: The Altar of Incense should not be confused with the Brazen Altar.  The Altar of Incense is the third piece of furniture in the Holy Place where incense was burned continually before God (Ex 30:1-10).  The incense was made from four precious spices stacte, onycha, galbanum and frankincense that were to be burned continually before the Lord.  The incense is symbolic of the prayers and intercession of the people going up before God as a sweet fragrance. “Let my prayer be set before You as incense, the lifting up of my hands as the evening sacrifice” (Ps 141:2).  “Another angel, who had a golden censer, came and stood at the altar. He was given much incense to offer, with the prayers of all the saints, on the golden altar before the throne. The smoke of the incense, together with the prayers of the saints, went up before God from the angel’s hand” (Revelations 8:3-4).

    Just as the horns of the Brazen Altar were sprinkled with blood from the animal sacrifice (Leviticus 4:7, 16:18) the horns of the Altar of Incense received the blood also.  Both sets of horns give us deep revelation of the power of the sacrificial blood.  The blood on the horns of the brazen altar represent the power of Christ’s blood to forgive sins, the horns on golden altar signify the power of His blood in prayer as we confess our sins and ask for forgiveness.


    Note:  The Horns of the Altar were constructed from the same material the altar itself was, Acacia Wood.  During Old Testament times Acacia Wood was a craftsman’s primary choice of material for furniture.  Acacia Wood was hard, durable, and resistant to insects and weather.   It is known as an incorruptible wood a quality which our Lord and Savior posses.  Thus, the horns are symbolic of God’s power and strength, God’s salvation, protection, security, sanctuary, and help.   Other scriptures that provide us insights to the meaning of the horns include Ex 30:10; Ps 89:24; 2Sam 22:3.

    These horns at the four corners of the altar of burnt offering were of one piece with the altar.  Each projection had the same purpose, derived from the same material, but had it own specific angel.  The four Gospels of Jesus Christ have the same purpose, were inspired from the same source, but each writer had their own specific audience to angle the Gospel toward.  For instance, the Gospel of Matthew was written to a Jewish audience proving Jesus lineage goes back to King David, while the Gospel of Luke was written by a Gentile to the Gentiles.  Each Gospel holds up, or gives evidence, to the birth, ministry, death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.   

    The horns of the altar were also a type and shadow of the nails used on the Cross on Calvary.  The horns were purposed for the Old Testament offering to keep the animal sacrifice in place.  As in the case of Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God, His flesh clung to the Cross by blood covered nails.  However, we must understand that the nails only held the body of Christ on the Cross.  Jesus had the power to step down from the Cross and no number of nails could have kept him there, but it was His love for humanity which kept Him hung despite the repugnancy and pain of Calvary.

    The horns of the altar were also a place of asylum before the cities of refuge were established by Moses for those found guilty of accidental manslaughter.  Moses designated six cities to act as a place of sanctuary for both citizens of Israel and strangers who sought safety from their avengers.  It was prerequisites if an individual stayed within the city his life was secured, but if he ventured out of the city he could be slain.  

    1Kings 1:50 and 2:28 record two examples of men seeking safety by clinging to the horns of the altar in Jerusalem. Neither Adonijah nor Joab were innocent and later were executed for their crimes.

    Many will find temporary asylum in the Church, even the unconverted, as did Adonijah and Joab.  However, in the case Adonijah and Joab whose motivation for grasping the horns of the altar were not sincere, nor did the period of grace they received cause them to repent, the sword still found them out.     

    It is a necessity for those who grab the horns of the altar to lay themselves before the altar and repent with a sincere heart, calling upon the name of the Lord to be their substitute in the payment of sin.   


    The Sin offering as recorded in the book of Leviticus was for unintentional or sins that have gone unaware.  This reveals to us that even when we sin in ignorance to the commands of God they are still punishable under the law and a sacrifice must be offered.  Just as in the case of an out of state driver who commits a traffic offence; though he may have been uninformed of that specific state’s regulations he is still susceptible to a citation. 

    However, God is not an unrighteous judge who condemns people solely based on their ignorance to His commands.  Take for instance Abimelech, in Genesis chapter 20 who unknowingly takes Sarah to be his concubine. The judgment of God did not strike Abimelech for his sin, but God speaks to Abimelech advising him of his sin and the pending judgment approaching.  Abimelech pleads his case to the Lord that he was deceived and Lord responds, “I also withheld thee from sinning against me…”  God had kept Abimelech from the full totality of the consequences of his sin because of His ignorance, but now because of Abimelech coming into the knowledge of his error he became responsibility to right his wrong.


    Note: Many of us who traveled from the world into the church experienced this same grace.  We had lived a debauchery life, fulfilling our fleshly desires without hesitation, in full rebellion to the things of God.  Many of us should have died in our sin, been killed or killed another because we drove intoxicated, diagnosed with a STD, and the list can continue.  But even in our sinful state God withheld the full consequences of our sin to bring us to place of awareness and then repentance. 


    The Sin offering sacrifice was necessary after the sin had been revealed.  “When the sin, which they have sinned against it, is know, then the congregation shall offer…” (Lev 4:14).  It was the purpose of the Law to make the people aware of their unintentional sins so that they would not repeat them and so that they could be forgiven.  God has now made men aware of their sinful state through the ministry of Jesus Christ, His Word, and the Holy Spirit.  It is in this dispensation of Grace that God has made all men aware of their sinful nature and long suffers with mankind to come to a place of repentance.  It is in this place the first step of salvation is cultivated, repentance.  “Repent and be baptized all of thee in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of your sins” (Acts 2:38).  Repentance, the awareness and decision to turn from wickedness, occurs before the blood of the Lamb is smeared upon the horns of the altar and shed upon the altar in our place. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Note: The four Horns of the Brazen Altar were smeared with the blood of the sacrifice, they served as binding posts for the sacrifice, and a place of asylum when they were clung to for safety from punishment.

    The Horns of the Altar were constructed from the same material the altar itself was, Acacia Wood.  During Old Testament times Acacia Wood was a craftsman’s primary choice of material for furniture.  Acacia Wood was hard, durable, and resistant to insects and weather.   It is known as an incorruptible wood a quality which our Lord and Savior posses.  Thus, the horns are symbolic of God’s power and strength, God’s salvation, protection, security, sanctuary, and help.   Other scriptures that provide us insights to the meaning of the horns include Ex 30:10; Ps 89:24; 2Sam 22:3.

    These horns at the four corners of the altar of burnt offering were of one piece with the altar.  Each projection had the same purpose, derived from the same material, but had it own specific angel.  The four Gospels of Jesus Christ have the same purpose, were inspired from the same source, but each writer had their own specific audience to angle the Gospel toward.  For instance, the Gospel of Matthew was written to a Jewish audience proving Jesus lineage goes back to King David, while the Gospel of Luke was written by a Gentile to the Gentiles.  Each Gospel holds up, or gives evidence, to the birth, ministry, death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.   

    The horns of the altar were also a type and shadow of the nails used on the Cross on Calvary.  The horns were purposed for the Old Testament offering to keep the animal sacrifice in place.  As in the case of Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God, His flesh clung to the Cross by blood covered nails.  However, we must understand that the nails only held the body of Christ on the Cross.  Jesus had the power to step down from the Cross and no amount of nails could have kept him there, but it was His love for humanity which kept Him hung despite the repugnancy and pain of Calvary.

    The horns of the altar were also a place of asylum before the cities of refuge were established by Moses for those found guilty of accidental manslaughter.  Moses designated six cities to act as a place of sanctuary for both citizens of Israel and strangers who sought safety from their avengers.  It was prerequisites as long as an individual stayed within the city his life was secured, but if he ventured out of the city he could be slain.  

    1Kings 1:50 and 2:28 record two examples of men seeking safety by clinging to the horns of the altar in Jerusalem. Neither Adonijah nor Joab were innocent and later were executed for their crimes.

    Many will find temporary asylum in the Church, even the unconverted, as did Adonijah and Joab.  However, in the case Adonijah and Joab whose motivation for grasping the horns of the altar were not sincere, nor did the period of grace they received cause them to repent, the sword still found them out.     

    It is a necessity for those who grab the horns of the altar to lay themselves before the altar and repent with a sincere heart, calling upon the name of the Lord to be their substitute in the payment of sin.   

    The Sin offering as recorded in the book of Leviticus was for unintentional or sins that have gone unaware.  This reveals to us that even when we sin in ignorance to the commands of God they are still punishable under the law and a sacrifice must be offered.  Just as in the case of an out of state driver who commits a traffic offence; though he may have been uninformed of that specific state’s regulations he is still susceptible to a citation. 

    However, God is not an unrighteous judge who condemns people solely based on their ignorance to His commands.  Take for instance Abimelech, in Genesis chapter 20 who unknowingly takes Sarah to be his concubine. The judgment of God did not strike Abimelech for his sin, but God speaks to Abimelech advising him of his sin and the pending judgment approaching.  Abimelech pleads his case to the Lord that he was deceived and Lord responds, “I also withheld thee from sinning against me…”  God had kept Abimelech from the full totality of the consequences of his sin because of His ignorance, but now as a result of Abimelech coming into the knowledge of his error he became responsibility to right his wrong.

    Note: Many of us who traveled from the world into the church experienced this same grace.  We had lived a debauchery life, fulfilling our fleshly desires without hesitation, in full rebellion to the things of God.  Many of us should have died in our sin, been killed or killed another because we drove intoxicated, diagnosed with a STD, and the list can continue.  But even in our sinful state God withheld the full consequences of our sin to bring us to place of awareness and then repentance. 

    The Sin offering sacrifice was necessary after the sin had been revealed.  “When the sin, which they have sinned against it, is know, then the congregation shall offer…” (Lev 4:14).  It was the purpose of the Law to make the people aware of their unintentional sins so that they would not repeat them and so that they could be forgiven.  God has now made men aware of their sinful state through the ministry of Jesus Christ, His Word, and the Holy Spirit.  It is in this dispensation of Grace that God has made all men aware of their sinful nature and long suffers with mankind to come to a place of repentance.  It is in this place the first step of salvation is cultivated, repentance.  “Repent and be baptized all of thee in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of your sins” (Acts 2:38).  Repentance, the awareness and decision to turn from wickedness, occurs before the blood of the Lamb is smeared upon the horns of the altar and shed upon the altar in our place.